Episode 1

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Published on:

9th Aug 2022

The Flow: Episode 1 - Why video podcasting?

The Flow : 1

Listen to The Flow

Podcasting, especially video podcasting, can be a great way to share your message with the world. There are so many things to learn and do, but it's hard to know where to start if you've never done it before.

Producing a podcast can seem daunting at first; it's easy to feel overwhelmed when you're starting something new. Using a Video First approach with Ecamm Live will make it much easier and save you lots of time.

The Flow is here to help. We'll take you step-by-step through creating a video podcast, from planning and production to promotion and monetization. You'll learn how to build an efficient workflow that will make your content shine, leaving you to focus on creating great content.

This inaugural episode will explain the benefits of a "video first" approach to podcasting and why it will make life easier for you.

Wanna Try Ecamm Live for 14 days free: https://ecamm.com

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The Flow website

Transcript
Doc:

Hello everybody.

Doc:

And welcome to The Flow.

Doc:

I am Doc Rock, community manager over here at Ecamm with

Katie:

Katie Fawkes.

Katie:

So happy to

Doc:

be here today.

Doc:

Yes.

Doc:

Today we are doing a brand new show.

Doc:

This is called The Flow.

Doc:

This is the Ecamm official podcast where we show you how to create

Doc:

a podcast using Ecamm, or any other software for that matter.

Doc:

But of course, you know, we want you to use Ecamm and we're gonna be talking to

Doc:

you about doing a video first podcast and how that can benefit you in your

Doc:

business, in promoting your content creation process, in your teachings, your

Doc:

learnings, whatever it is that you're generating your podcast for, we are

Doc:

gonna be doing a podcast talking about growing cactuses in a tropical area.

Doc:

No, I'm just joking.

Katie:

Sorry gardeners.

Doc:

Wait.

Doc:

I think one of our people is really good at gardening.

Doc:

She might know how to do that.

Doc:

I don't.

Doc:

I'm not even gonna start to pretend like I know how to grow anything.

Doc:

So I do know how to grow a podcast.

Doc:

So we're gonna work with that.

Doc:

We're gonna record and go through some topics for you.

Doc:

Of course.

Doc:

If you have any topics that you would like to see us talk about, please

Doc:

reach out to us at flow.ecamm.com.

Doc:

Okay.

Doc:

So let's get started with The Flow.

Katie:

In this week's episode, we're gonna be talking all about

Katie:

video podcasting, namely, what is it and why should you care?

Katie:

There are a lot of questions about what the difference is between video

Katie:

podcasting and audio podcasting.

Katie:

Is there a difference between live streaming and video podcasting?

Katie:

We're gonna break all of that down for you today so that you know whether

Katie:

or not you should be expanding into video or starting with a video podcast.

Katie:

So yeah, we're gonna break it all down.

Doc:

Sounds like a plan.

Doc:

Okay.

Doc:

Let's get in the first question.

Doc:

Katie, could you read this to the people at home, please?

Katie:

What is video podcasting?

Katie:

This

Doc:

is a really, really good question because a lot of people are going to

Doc:

be under the assumption that video podcasting is new, but it's not.

Doc:

If you go back to when you got your podcast from iTunes, back in

Doc:

the day, there used to actually be a button to separate the video

Doc:

podcast versus the audio podcast.

Katie:

Oh, interesting.

Doc:

Apple was very focused on that at one point, especially.

Doc:

I wanna say circa 2009 or 10, when they first dropped the original Apple TV.

Doc:

If you were to go into iTunes, there was a podcast situation there.

Doc:

If you got the OG Apple TV, the flat one that looks very much similar

Doc:

to what Mac Minis look like today.

Doc:

When you launched it, the pages would load.

Doc:

And you know, you have all your icons, like you see in your iPhone

Doc:

and your Apple TV today, but across the top would be the most popular

Doc:

video podcasts that are out there.

Doc:

One of them was TWiT, which I'm on all the time.

Doc:

Right.

Doc:

So it is been there for quite a while, but what Apple realized, about the

Doc:

time Serial came about and some of the other podcasts, one of my favorites.

Doc:

This American Life that just broke the mold on podcasting,

Doc:

Pat Flynn, one of our friends...

Doc:

shout out to Pat.

Doc:

Yep.

Doc:

He had the number one video podcast in the planet and he was

Doc:

averaging about 7,000 downloads.

Doc:

Which wow.

Doc:

Seems like a lot.

Doc:

I'm not even pretend seems that is actually a lot.

Doc:

But not.

Doc:

Actually a ton.

Doc:

Not in the nature of what it took to become the number one podcast, right?

Doc:

So he was number one in video, but not number one in podcasts.

Doc:

Even then he was getting well over a hundred thousand downloads on the

Doc:

standard podcast, but like 7,000.

Doc:

So you were getting say less than 10% people that were doing video.

Doc:

Yeah.

Doc:

Since that time I wanna call it like circa twenty fourteen, fifteen, since

Doc:

that time, YouTube and others have really brought the video show to the forefront.

Doc:

People that make live streaming software allotted be a lot

Doc:

easier to record video podcasts.

Doc:

I don't know who that could be, but no ideas here.

Doc:

When that started, it did allow for video podcasts to start to grow.

Doc:

And of course, most famously, Spotify picking up the Joe Rogan show.

Doc:

And that brought up a lot of attention back to video podcasting.

Doc:

So in reality, in my head, it seems as if the technology caught up to the idea.

Katie:

Yeah.

Katie:

Yeah.

Katie:

It's it is interesting cuz it, it definitely was the space where

Katie:

they were merged and then they kind of separated and now we're seeing

Katie:

them coming back together again.

Katie:

And I think a lot of the really, you know, the really incredibly popular

Katie:

podcasts that you listen to, probably on a regular basis, like the rest of

Katie:

us out there are starting to think about, oh shoot you know, we haven't

Katie:

been capturing video or they've been capturing video, but they've been doing

Katie:

it in a different kind of way where it's, you know, like a special event or you

Katie:

know, behind the scenes video coverage.

Katie:

And the audiences are starting to want to engage with them in all of these different

Katie:

ways and be able to actually see them and feel a little bit more part of it.

Katie:

So, yeah, it's interesting how it has become this very, they're very different

Katie:

audiences, listeners versus viewers, but yeah started together, kind of separate,

Katie:

and then now coming back together.

Katie:

It'll be interesting to see what happens.

Doc:

Yeah, I think so.

Doc:

The main thing to understand is there's not a primary difference between a video

Doc:

podcast and an audio podcast other than by doing a video focus first, there are some

Doc:

benefits that you get from that, which we will explain really, really quickly.

Doc:

And then I just wanna let you know that for instance, our particular podcast

Doc:

host, which is Captivate, they don't actually support video podcasts, but

Doc:

we wanted to use the anyway because of the many advantages that they had.

Doc:

But there are many of them out there that do support video podcasts,

Doc:

and you can just upload your video and it will take care of the rest.

Doc:

We went with Captivate for very specific reasons.

Doc:

And Doc is the weirdo that really thinks that YouTube is going to make a

Doc:

podcast button in the very near future.

Doc:

So we decided to just record it, live to tape here on YouTube, and

Doc:

then within the week, get it edited and post it up as a regular podcast.

Katie:

Yeah, well, this plays to our strengths.

Katie:

And again, like really is the focus of why we wanted to do a show called The Flow.

Katie:

And we wanted to really think through what those workflows are.

Katie:

At Ecamm we've been preaching for the last, I don't know, few years

Katie:

now, if not more, that, if you can really think through this live to tape

Katie:

mentality, if you build the content and start with video, and you're

Katie:

starting with live streaming, in many cases, you're able to pick up a

Katie:

ton of different kinds of audiences.

Katie:

And you're able to use that content in a lot of different ways.

Katie:

You're doing the work once and you're able to do a ton with that versus

Katie:

recording a video and then, you know, having to edit that and then being

Katie:

like, oh, now I need to record the audio only podcast version of it.

Katie:

Oh, now I need to write a blog post.

Katie:

Oh, now I need to, you know, do all of these different steps.

Katie:

If you can get into the habit into the flow if you can get into the flow

Katie:

of starting live and doing this live tape, or even, you know, starting with

Katie:

a recorded video, but video first.

Katie:

You'll be done.

Katie:

You won't need to do a ton of other editing.

Katie:

On the other side, you won't need to, you know, redo that content.

Katie:

You won't need to rewrite that blog post.

Katie:

We're gonna walk through throughout this series, all of the different steps that

Katie:

you need to take, all of our favorite tools and partners that make that process

Katie:

really seamless that make it so that you don't have to spend a ton of time.

Katie:

Planning first content first is gonna help you get to a space

Katie:

where it will become a flow.

Katie:

It will become really seamless for you to go through.

Katie:

So I, you know, it is, we will say in the world of video podcasting,

Katie:

it is easier to start with video than it is to pick it up later.

Katie:

And it may seem like a bigger jump, but it's gonna save you so much time and

Katie:

likely a lot of money in the long run.

Katie:

Start live streaming or to start video first and then be able to leverage that

Katie:

across all these different channels.

Doc:

Absolutely.

Doc:

That was one of the things that Leo had always set up for

Doc:

us when we were doing TWiT.

Doc:

Is that recording it on a Tuesday?

Doc:

As a live video, it gave the community a chance to build around your podcast.

Doc:

One of the hardest things about making a podcast grow is building a community

Doc:

around it, by doing a live show.

Doc:

First, that's much easier to build community because as I can see in

Doc:

the comments here, we are already getting questions that once we break

Doc:

into the after show or the QA, or however you wanna set your show up,

Doc:

we can fully answer those right now.

Doc:

They don't have to wait until the podcast comes out, we check all the emails and

Doc:

then three shows later, we fit it in where we can answer their question.

Doc:

We can get their questions answered right now.

Katie:

Well, and it gives us content ideas, too.

Katie:

You know, it really,

Doc:

My next point exactly gives you content.

Doc:

So, thank you people in the comments.

Doc:

Live show audience!

Doc:

Thank you.

Doc:

You guys are really helping us out.

Katie:

The good thing to keep in mind just before we finish off this first

Katie:

question, too, is that, and you're a great example of this Doc, and I think a

Katie:

lot of our Ecamm fam typical live viewers who show up for a lot of these sessions.

Katie:

They, you know, they have smart TVs or they're at their workstation.

Katie:

So it is a lot easier these days to passively participate in video watching

Katie:

than it used to be, where you used to have to have a higher level of intention.

Katie:

You be like, okay, well now I'm gonna sit down.

Katie:

I'm gonna put on YouTube.

Katie:

And you know, this is my time where I'm watching this, or this is my time

Katie:

where I'm zoning out and kind of flying through all these different videos.

Katie:

Now it can be something where it does feel a little bit more like an audio podcast

Katie:

where, you can be viewing it and glancing it while you're making dinner or you're

Katie:

working or you're setting up something, you can have an on in the background

Katie:

where you can still look up, you might be able to ask questions and engage,

Katie:

here and there in a way that an audio only podcast isn't going to allow for.

Katie:

So I think YouTube has already made that possible to have a little bit more

Katie:

passive watching in the background.

Doc:

I don't know if they still sell these things, but there used to be a

Doc:

company called Chef Sleeves and they made sleeves that went over your iPad.

Doc:

It's basically like sticking your iPad in a Ziploc bag, but it was easier to see.

Katie:

Yeah, exactly.

Katie:

Yep.

Doc:

I used to always stick my iPad in there and be sitting there cooking

Doc:

and fully, you know, checking out the show like I'm watching, you

Doc:

know, Renee and Andy wax about new Apple chips or whatever, while I'm

Doc:

making potato chips, you know, it was just kind of a weird thing.

Doc:

And so, yeah, you're right.

Doc:

Much easier to consume while you're doing something else these days.

Doc:

Very, very good point.

Doc:

Let's jump into 0.2 real quick, Katie, if you would read

Doc:

this to the audience at home.

Katie:

Hang on.

Katie:

Hang on, hang on.

Katie:

What makes video podcasting different from live streaming?

Doc:

That miss lady is a very good question.

Doc:

Reality is I wanna say nothing, but then a little different, so

Doc:

one event is intentionality, right?

Doc:

So in my personal brand, one of the things I talk about is intent and purpose.

Doc:

Like, what is your intent?

Doc:

And are you working on a purpose?

Doc:

And if you have that purpose in place, the rest of this becomes a lot easier.

Doc:

So when people are starting a show, like if you're starting a brand new show and

Doc:

it's like, hey, I just wanna make a show.

Doc:

Are you just making it because everyone's making a podcast or do

Doc:

you have a very specific purpose that you are driving towards?

Doc:

If you have a specific purpose you're driving towards, you can

Doc:

set up your intentionality to do sort of like we're doing today,

Doc:

come in, say hello to everyone.

Doc:

Let everybody know the housekeeping rules.

Doc:

Record your podcast live.

Doc:

Capture questions in the chat as you go along, answer those at the end.

Doc:

And now you can take that middle section that you record it with, you

Doc:

know, intent and intent to record it.

Doc:

And the purpose of putting it back out as a solid piece of content.

Doc:

That's a little different in the live streams.

Doc:

A lot of times I'll get to bantering with my people in the

Doc:

chat and kind of goofing off.

Doc:

And, you know, we start out talking about, you know, Shure

Doc:

MV7, and next thing you know, we're talking about fly fishing yeah.

Doc:

So in this case, you're going down a very relatable path.

Katie:

Yeah, I feel like Ian Anderson Gray did a really good job breaking

Katie:

this down in our Podcaster Hour series.

Katie:

If you watch that one or listen to that one, but you really need

Katie:

to be thinking about the different kinds of audiences that you're

Katie:

reaching in that particular workflow.

Katie:

So the workflow that we have for this show is that we are doing this live to tape.

Katie:

So we have a live viewer audience.

Katie:

That means that we also have a replay viewer audience.

Katie:

So we need to be thinking about people that are not engaging live with us

Katie:

that are here, you know, swinging by and watching this video later.

Katie:

What is that experience like for them?

Katie:

We need to be thinking about our podcast listeners.

Katie:

So shout out to the podcast listeners out there who don't see us.

Katie:

We need to make sure that anything that we're showing or demonstrating, we're able

Katie:

to talk through so that they can hear us.

Katie:

And then we're also thinking probably down the line too, about blog readers

Katie:

or people out on the various social platforms where we're sharing content.

Katie:

So the format or the run of show that we have for this show needs to

Katie:

reflect that upfront before we go live, otherwise we'll mess up the flow.

Katie:

And then it won't be easy for us to repurpose that content later.

Katie:

So doing it in the structure that Doc just talked about,

Katie:

lets us trim off that beginning.

Katie:

That housekeeping part that's really relevant to a live audience isn't

Katie:

relevant to any of the other audiences.

Katie:

So it lets us trim off that end part that Q and A, you know, maybe we

Katie:

can use that content in a different way, but it's probably not overly

Katie:

relevant for podcast listeners who feel like they can't be part of it or,

Katie:

you know, blog readers, for example.

Katie:

Yeah.

Katie:

Having that structure, having that run of show, lets us not have to do

Katie:

a ton of editing on the other side, which is a win for everyone, right?

Doc:

Yes.

Doc:

Yes.

Doc:

And then one of the other fantastic things about this is which you'll

Doc:

find out as we get into our flow.

Doc:

There are tools that allow you to take your recording and

Doc:

generate a full text transcript.

Doc:

Podcasts are very powerful for the show notes.

Doc:

Although you may not post an actual blog from your content if you take

Doc:

a full text transcript of your show, plus your show links and things like

Doc:

that, and you place it on your podcast.

Doc:

Captivate comes with a website.

Doc:

I believe many of the other Buzz Sprouts and Pod Bean.

Doc:

I know Pod Bean does cuz I used to use that they come with podcast websites.

Doc:

So if you have the plan that allows you to have a podcast website, just

Doc:

putting up your show notes alone are giving you tons of SEO value.

Doc:

Right?

Katie:

Mm-hmm

Doc:

and the thing that's really cool.

Doc:

Okay.

Doc:

Listen up folks.

Doc:

This is funny.

Doc:

I just thought about this.

Doc:

So I have to process this in.

Doc:

When you are speaking, you speak the way humans speak.

Doc:

Oftentimes when we write, we write the way Mrs.

Doc:

Rosen taught us to write in 12th grade with the cigarette.

Katie:

Shout out to Mrs.

Katie:

Rosen.

Doc:

Oh, she was mean to me.

Doc:

She hated me.

Katie:

Oh, we take it back.

Katie:

We take it back.

Katie:

We don't wanna shout out.

Doc:

As you can probably guess I was a little bit of a smart ass in school.

Doc:

Anyway, ignoring that fact when you do this, you're speaking.

Doc:

Believe it or not, the SEO experts of the past, most of them are wrong

Doc:

about what SEO is now because Google doesn't like the way people have

Doc:

tried to cheat the SEO system.

Doc:

They're always looking for natural language and natural language flow.

Doc:

People also tend to type out questions.

Doc:

The way that they talk, which is why, when we do a live stream, we

Doc:

have to tell people, oftentimes, can you please rephrase the question?

Doc:

Because they said in as if you could hear them to answer them back and you would

Doc:

catch the contact and the inflictions with the voice to text capabilities.

Doc:

You are generating so much SEO content around your brand because

Doc:

you're just literally putting up a full transcript with the show notes.

Doc:

And the many times that we mentioned Ecamm Live for podcasting, just in conversation

Doc:

here will generate when someone types into the Google Foo Ecamm Live for podcasting

Doc:

or can Ecamm be used for podcasting?

Doc:

Those things are going to come up now.

Doc:

See, I'm not keyword stuffing, I'm just talking, but it is kind of sort

Doc:

of keyword stuffing, but when Google reads the sentence, it'll read it.

Doc:

Hey, human said that.

Doc:

Let it slide.

Doc:

So, yeah, that has a very key point to keep in the back of your nugget.

Katie:

Yeah.

Katie:

And we did drop into the show notes and into the description here on YouTube.

Katie:

If you're watching, a link to one of our favorite tools, which is Descript, we

Katie:

will go into much more detail about this in future episodes, but you're right.

Katie:

Like it does work really well for show notes.

Katie:

It works really well for a transcript.

Katie:

It can be turned into a blog post.

Katie:

It can be listed on your website.

Katie:

It's also great to use and, you know, with a little bit of tweaking, pretty minimal,

Katie:

as closed captions for YouTube as well, which again is just helping all of the

Katie:

search engines, the Googles of the world, to be able to understand what it is that

Katie:

you are talking about, what your video and what your audio content is about.

Katie:

You know, search engines, can't see videos, they need the text.

Katie:

So it goes a really long way to have that added step.

Katie:

For sure.

Doc:

So, again, it's really important to remember.

Doc:

There is not a massive difference between a livestream and a video podcast other

Doc:

than intentionality, your intention, and probably a much more structured show

Doc:

flow because you want your podcast to have a natural beginning and end to it.

Doc:

You're going to make space for your intro, make space for your outro, make space for

Doc:

your housekeeping and you know, that's how to find your podcast and things like that.

Doc:

So it's more or less intentionality.

Doc:

Okay.

Doc:

All right.

Doc:

So I think we got that.

Doc:

Let's get down to the last, we, this is gonna be super cool.

Doc:

Okay.

Doc:

Miss Katie, could you please read this to the audience at home?

Katie:

I need a better reading voice for all these fun things, but what

Katie:

are the benefits to video podcasting?

Doc:

Ooh, this is a good one.

Doc:

Okay, gang.

Doc:

Let's just tell you

Katie:

why do it Doc?

Katie:

Why should we do it?

Doc:

Talk about saving time family.

Doc:

This will save you so bunch time.

Doc:

I know you may not think it will, but it absolutely will.

Doc:

Let me explain to you why.

Doc:

You record your podcast as a video podcast, you bring it into an

Doc:

application like Descript and Descript will allow you to edit it right there.

Doc:

If you are like me and really, really quick in say Final Cut.

Doc:

I can edit a video in Final Cut much quicker than I can edit a raw audio file.

Doc:

Why?

Doc:

Because I can see.

Doc:

I have context to go with the editing.

Doc:

So if I'm sliding, sliding, sliding, I'm looking for that

Doc:

place where I know I messed up.

Doc:

All I gotta do is watch the hands come up and be like holy or I can see the

Doc:

verbals of the bad words that comes out.

Doc:

Yeah.

Doc:

A lot of people wanna know like, well, how do you place in the marker?

Doc:

You can put visual markers.

Doc:

So when I go to do a podcast, I can scrub really quickly.

Doc:

I look for that couple seconds, hold right here.

Doc:

Realize that's a section where I'm going to block out.

Doc:

You can use hand signals.

Doc:

I keep a cloth for the camera nearby.

Doc:

You can just do one of these real quick.

Doc:

There you in your Stream Deck, you can make a button that pulls

Doc:

up an entire thing that caused in the marker in the place.

Doc:

I can do something like this real quick as a reminder to cut right there.

Doc:

And then you won't see that on the actual output, you know, whenever

Doc:

we're ready to send that out to audio because, well, there's no picture.

Doc:

So you, there's a lot of things that you can do for that nature.

Doc:

My other point again, would be you can answer the questions

Doc:

of the people in the comments.

Doc:

Also, you have the ability to talk to your studio audience.

Doc:

You're already building your community around the initial 40 people that

Doc:

watched this primary episode.

Doc:

I can talk to every single one of these people at the end, and they're more

Doc:

excited to come back the next week and see the next part of the process.

Katie:

I mean, it just increases your opportunities, right?

Katie:

So, I mean, in addition to saving a ton of time, it's also reaching more people.

Katie:

There are gonna be people who are video only people who don't

Katie:

wanna listen to a podcast.

Katie:

They're on YouTube or any of these different platforms.

Katie:

And they want to be able to see people they want to participate.

Katie:

And so you were missing out on them if you were audio only.

Katie:

And I do think that at certain points, and I know this, even

Katie:

with myself, raise your hand.

Katie:

If you're the person who has, you know, listened to a podcast

Katie:

and immediately Google searched, what that person looks like.

Katie:

Right?

Katie:

Like there, there is a fascination in wanting to kind of have that

Katie:

inside look, you feel as though you are spending time with these people.

Katie:

So hopefully you'll feel like you're spending time with Doc and I.

Katie:

It'll give, you know, an understanding of who we are as people.

Katie:

People crave that level of connection.

Katie:

So at some point, even if you are in an audio only space, that people that are

Katie:

gonna want to be able to engage with you or see you or get to know you better.

Katie:

So you're missing out on that opportunity if you're not starting

Katie:

with video and you're certainly missing out if you're not adding it

Katie:

on, if you've been at it for a bit.

Katie:

So it.

Katie:

It's going to be important if it isn't important already for you in

Katie:

just being able to reach more people and reach them with the kind of

Katie:

content that they're looking for.

Doc:

Yeah.

Doc:

I think you read about the fact that people do connect with us visually.

Doc:

Mm-hmm.

Doc:

For instance, I think one of the reasons why the video show kind of took

Doc:

off doing the pandemic is there are a lot of people who were separated from

Doc:

their families or they weren't on their standard grind with their friends.

Doc:

So they had to generate their V friends or their virtual friends.

Doc:

So I can tell you definitely waking up in the morning to hear

Doc:

Ian Anderson, Gray on or Stephanie Liu on, or like Jim and Chris on.

Doc:

There's many times where, you know, I'm by myself, I'm at the house I'm

Doc:

cleaning or cooking or, you know, doing something of that nature.

Katie:

Yep.

Doc:

Sometimes even working on, you know, content for the next show.

Doc:

And I am listening to Tom and Heather or on, or ana and Fuljens

Doc:

or, you know, you and Jill.

Doc:

The Katie and Jill show is boss.

Doc:

Like I can't wait for season two.

Doc:

Right.

Doc:

So definitely a lot of times I feel like I'm sitting there cruising with

Doc:

my friends and you know, this is true because I bring this up all the time.

Doc:

When I met Diana in real space or I call it meat space.

Doc:

Yeah.

Doc:

When I met her in meat space with M E a T not E E T, we started straight talking and

Doc:

getting to work and doing what we were do.

Doc:

Yeah.

Doc:

We forgot the grand hello.

Doc:

Right.

Doc:

We forgot that.

Doc:

Oh my God.

Doc:

It's finally good to finally meet you because we are in

Doc:

the video space together.

Doc:

So often.

Doc:

We felt like that part had already happened, which was really weird.

Doc:

Like it took us literally five hours before we realized

Doc:

we never had the, oh my God.

Doc:

Hey girl hey moment.

Doc:

Because you're just with them all the time.

Doc:

They become your TV friends or your TV family.

Doc:

And a lot of conversation has been happening recently around

Doc:

the parasocial relationship that you develop with your people.

Doc:

Video does bring that to the table much better.

Doc:

And the last takeaway I have on this is before I went on my vacation to Seattle.

Doc:

Karen's mom would watch all myriad things on TV.

Doc:

Then I got her a YouTube premium account and TV just went off.

Doc:

Right?

Doc:

Here's a 76 year old lady who is English as a second language who watches

Doc:

YouTube more than regular television.

Doc:

And one, she could find her people there.

Doc:

Right.

Doc:

She could find her people there.

Doc:

Right.

Doc:

She could find other, Okinawa people that speak her name.

Doc:

Okinawan is slightly different from Japanese.

Doc:

I mean, it's, it's sort of like, you know, Puerto Rican, Spanish versus

Doc:

Mexican speaking Spanish versus Dominican speaking Spanish, we all

Doc:

have a different little flare to it.

Doc:

Kind of like Massachusetts to Texas.

Doc:

Totally different conversation, mostly English, but slightly different.

Doc:

And what was funny is I was grading Dina.

Doc:

One of the people that I teach, I was grading a stream that she was doing and

Doc:

she fell in love with Dina's stream.

Doc:

And so now she's like, hey when are you gonna...

Doc:

when are you gonna...

Doc:

next time gonna live.

Doc:

She says, live screen.

Doc:

When are you gonna live screen with Dina?

Doc:

And I'm like, what are you talking about?

Doc:

But when we went to go meet her in person, now she has a physical connection to Dina.

Doc:

Yeah.

Doc:

And so when she watches it, now she is yelling at the TV.

Doc:

Giving Dina tips in the kitchen or telling her, oh, I didn't know that.

Doc:

Thank you, Dina.

Doc:

And she's having a full conversation with Dina.

Katie:

Yes.

Katie:

She's got a relationship

Doc:

and Dina cannot hear her, but she doesn't know that.

Doc:

So what's really cute about this is in Dina's stream she she's teaching

Doc:

you how to make a drink first, and then she prepares the meal.

Doc:

And then she presents the meal and the drink together.

Doc:

In Hawaii we say, suck 'em up when we say drinking, right?

Doc:

It's a local term for drinking.

Doc:

She's like, Dina, don't suck 'em up before you cut something,

Doc:

Baba, you cut your finger.

Doc:

And Baba is a Filipino word for later.

Doc:

Sure.

Doc:

As grits is grocery in that episode, Dina nicked her finger and she's like,

Doc:

see, I told you don't suck 'em up first.

Doc:

You know, make sure you know, you were do your stuff, cook it

Doc:

first and then suck 'em up later.

Doc:

And it's funny.

Doc:

I'm like, I could make a whole show of just her reacting

Doc:

to someone on the screen.

Doc:

And so you do build that relationship with your people.

Doc:

And so by all means, even if you have a face for radio, do the video people.

Katie:

Yeah, no one cares.

Katie:

The amount of time we spend worrying about whether or not we look our best or that

Katie:

everything is like absolutely perfect.

Katie:

People care a lot more about the content and the authentic relationship

Katie:

than they do about your hair or your makeup or your clothing or everything.

Katie:

So, yeah, don't overthink that to death.

Katie:

You, you got

Doc:

this my hair part is on purpose.

Katie:

Except for you, Doc, we're judging everything that you

Katie:

. Doc: I'm cool with it, man.

Katie:

I've been judged my whole life.

Katie:

I'm totally down with this, you know, it's funny, but yes, I do think the

Katie:

video process A helps you build community faster and B it's a lot easier to

Katie:

just sit down and do your content.

Katie:

Also, I think one that we forgot to mention is right now looking into the

Katie:

chat and seeing all our friends that are here, I'm not talking to myself.

Katie:

When you record a podcast to yourself, that is harder.

Katie:

It's easier to talk when you have your friends there and just tell 'em okay.

Katie:

I am gonna flub 80,000 words.

Katie:

I don't know if you know me, but I'm Doc, I am the flub word specialist.

Katie:

I can edit it out if I want.

Katie:

I probably won't even edit those out.

Katie:

I think it's good to let people hear you as a person.

Katie:

I, a hundred percent believe the internet is over gurus.

Katie:

People are looking for people just like me.

Katie:

A hundred percent.

Katie:

I could not agree more.

Katie:

The last thing that I wanna spend time with is listening to someone who I feel

Katie:

is so, you know, far beyond where I'm at.

Katie:

Like, we want people that we can relate to, that we can laugh

Katie:

with and feel ourselves with.

Doc:

Absolutely.

Doc:

It's scrolling

Doc:

quickly.

Doc:

But the sad part is I don't see any bald fat guys in the chat, so

Katie:

Are we heading into questions?

Katie:

I think, I think we did it.

Doc:

We're just about ready to head into questions, people.

Doc:

So if you want to catch the show live, you can catch.

Doc:

What is that?

Katie:

Tuesday's at 12:00 PM.

Katie:

There you go.

Katie:

Eastern 9:00 AM Pacific and it is way too early in the morning, Hawaii time.

Katie:

but you're welcome to join us.

Katie:

That's Hawaii.

Doc:

Yes, you can catch us Tuesdays for the live show.

Doc:

The live show will be chopped up edited.

Doc:

It comes out a week later on your podcast aggregator...

Doc:

is the proper terminology, on your podcast software app, whatever you

Doc:

have in your phone or your TV or your car, even nowadays like CarPlay podcast

Doc:

app, which is brilliant because I can find out whether the murderer did

Doc:

what they did on True Crime Obsessed.

Doc:

My favorite podcast.

Doc:

I can't believe I admitted that, like I got that podcast.

Doc:

No, I'm right there with you.

Doc:

So right there with you.

Doc:

It's so good.

Doc:

That is my, that is my shameless TV for the week is actually a podcast.

Doc:

So don't forget every Tuesday we're recorded live.

Doc:

If you want to be here, be a part of the live studio audience, or you can

Doc:

catch us in your podcast aggregator.

Doc:

So at this point in time, we want to thank you guys for listening

Doc:

to this first episode of the flow.

Doc:

And we will roll into our studio audience and ask questions.

Doc:

But if you have any questions for us and you're listening to this on

Doc:

the audio format, please send in your questions to flow@ecamm.com.

Doc:

Once again, you can reach us at flow@ecamm.com.

Doc:

Thank you, Katie.

Katie:

And next week, we're gonna be talking about the future of podcasting.

Katie:

So whether you join us live or audio, only if you wanna learn more

Katie:

about where podcasting is going, be sure to tune in for that episode,

Katie:

send this question's in advance.

Katie:

If you want, whether you're listening or you're watching live, we'd

Katie:

be happy to take your questions.

Katie:

So

Show artwork for The Flow

About the Podcast

The Flow
Let's go with The Flow.
Have you ever wanted to know how to launch, produce, and promote a video podcast? There are lots of ways to get started, but to really succeed, you need to get into the Flow of it.

Welcome to The Flow. Created by Ecamm and hosted by Doc Rock and Katie Fawkes, this weekly show will take you step-by-step through the process of video podcasting. Our focus is on building efficient and effective workflows so that your content shines.

Join us Tuesdays at 12pm Eastern on YouTube and subscribe and listen on your favorite podcast platform.

About your hosts

Katie Fawkes

Profile picture for Katie Fawkes
Katie Fawkes is the Director of Marketing at Ecamm Network where she gets to work alongside some of the most amazing live streamers, podcasters, presenters, and content creators out there, helping them reach their goals and grow their business using video marketing and live streaming.

She’s been working in the world of Marketing for her entire career and the coolest thing about her is that she keeps backyard chickens.

Doc Rock

Profile picture for Doc Rock
As the Community Manager at Ecamm Network, Doc is a Creator on a serious mission to remove the friction of the creation process. His 4-decade career expands over several industries, including TV, Radio, Film, and Podcasting. Intently focused on making content creation accessible to all skill levels, audiences love Doc's practical strategies they can apply personally and professionally.

Oh, did we mention that Doc is from Hawai'i? Why does that matter? Well, it means he brings a lot of sunshine and the "Aloha Spirit" with him everywhere he goes.